Blossoms and Birds

Ask Away!    Submit   Elora. 21. I'm currently working for a BA in Art History and Classics (they'll show up occasionally). But I adore birds. Always have. They are incredibly amazing balls of fluff and feathers. 90% of what I post here is in appreciation for those creatures which have inspired and awed me.

Almost all of the images posted here are not mine. Those that are will be marked either in the tags or the description. If an image is yours and not marked as such, send me a message and I will correct the source or take it down. I'm seriously considering going to grad school for Library Science and Digital Humanities, so I take that shit very seriously.

Feel free to ask me just about anything! I've never pretended to know anything scientific about birds and I sadly do not have a pet bird, so I can't say I know much about that either. But I do know plenty of blogs that could help you with those types of questions. However, I can field some questions about identification and birding basics.

rhamphotheca:

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana)

Avocets are the most numerous species of shorebird on the Bolivar Peninsula of Texas, in the winter when you may find over 10,000 on Bolivar Flats. Avocets use their distinctive upturned bill to catch small fish and invertebrates like shrimp. Their bill is very sensitive so they are able to feed day or night.

Avocets are black and white during the winter and have a rusty neck and head during the nesting season. They nest on small islands or boggy shorelines in shallow lakes through out the west. A few non breeders summer on the Texas coast and the large number of wintering birds return in September and October and stay until late April.

photos: top - male; bttm - female  (by Greg Lavaty)

(via: Houston Audubon)

(via impenguin2)

— 2 days ago with 118 notes
#American Avocet  #bird  #my boo 
libutron:

American Robin (leucistic) | ©Robert Lewis
This partially leucistic American robin, Turdus migratorius (Passeriformes - Turdidae), found on Alvarado Road in Berkeley (California, US), has an interesting pattern of white and normal feathers, both on the head, back, wings and tail and also on the orange breast, caused by a failure to incorporate melanin into the feather structure - but only for some feathers.

libutron:

American Robin (leucistic) | ©Robert Lewis

This partially leucistic American robin, Turdus migratorius (Passeriformes - Turdidae), found on Alvarado Road in Berkeley (California, US), has an interesting pattern of white and normal feathers, both on the head, back, wings and tail and also on the orange breast, caused by a failure to incorporate melanin into the feather structure - but only for some feathers.

(via impenguin2)

— 2 days ago with 304 notes
#leucistic robin  #bird  #nature  #wildlife  #robin  #american robin